“The Emperor has No Clothes” says Senator Bob Corker. Well, more or less.

I’ve been waiting for months for someone who has supported Trump in the past who finally can’t take it anymore.  Can’t pretend Trump’s administration is doing well.  That person turns out to be one Senator Bob Corker who, to the New York Times, “charged in an interview on Sunday that President Trump was treating his office like “a reality show,” with reckless threats toward other countries that could set the nation “on the path to World War III.”

If you haven’t heard of the tweet hand grenade exchange this weekend between Corker and Trump, it ended with Corker writing:  “It’s a shame the White House has become an adult day care center. Someone obviously missed their shift this morning.” 

Can you guess the adult who requires day care?

You could say Corker started it with some criticisms of Trump’s handling of the Charlottesville protest last May, suggesting his comments were not up to the standards of a president.  That he needed to up his game.

Much more recently Corker referred to the trio of Secretary of Defense Mattis, Chief of Staff Kelly and Secretary of State Tillerson as what keeps the White House from falling into chaos, not something the blister thin skin of “our” president could take, so Trump went to tweeting to tear Corker down, which led to Corker’s reply above.

In typical Trump fashion, he is so intent on getting back at Corker that he pays no attention to the importance of having the senator as an ally in congress if he actually wants to get anything done.   I believe Trump doesn’t ultimately care what he accomplishes as long as we all stay riveted to his “show” and he can makes us believe he’s accomplishing a lot.  And where that fails to place blame on someone else, the reverse of Harry Truman’s the “buck stops here”.   With Trump the buck stops anywhere except with him.

I urge you to read the notes of the  interview with Corker in the New York Times.  Because Corker is the chair of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and also on the Senate Budget Committee, this fall out between Trump and him could have numerous ramifications on what gets passed in congress and how our foreign relations develop, especially with North Korea and Iran.

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The Vegas Massacre and the New Normal

In the background Donald Trump is giving the standard stock speech about praying for the victims and their families and insisting “we are here for you”.   What is being here for you mean?  I realize that public figures have to say something, but do you think anyone feels consoled by these rote statements?  Just part of the necessary ritual I guess.

Nevada, an open carry state, has few gun laws, so no problem carrying around 50 caliber rifles that make grim jokes of the idea of “bullet proof” vests.   It accentuates the valor of the police and other first responders, but that won’t likely stop congress from passing a law now being considered to allow for more gun silencers, according to Bill Bratton,  former New York police commissioner.

Hunters want them to protect their hearing, it is argued.  That silencers could help insanely angry shooters avoid immediate detection doesn’t count for much I guess.

In subtle ways I think we are all becoming more like Israelis.   We have to live our lives with dim thoughts of sudden horrific attack tripping across our minds.   Talked to an Israeli on a plane awhile back and she said you get use to it.  She said it’s not all negative.  It helps you feel more alive.

I favor other ways to make me feel more alive.   Terror tends to make me want to stick to small venues, such as my condo.  Controlling guns seems off the table, even though it will be talked about a lot as usual.  Instead we seem more inclined to reshape the world for our self protection.  I heard a weapons expert suggest metal detectors be placed in all Casinos.  Also, I heard talk of making alterations in buildings to make clear lines of sight harder for shooters to find.  If we can’t control guns I guess we have to do something.

I can imagine small ways we can keep ourselves safer.   Bomb sniffing Apple watches might become the new craze.

Imagine a mother daughter conversation prior to a concert:  “Don’t forget your Kevlar vest, honey.” “Mom, those vests aren’t really great, and it doesn’t match my outfit.  I’ll just have to take my chances.”  “O. K. just remember to duck and cover.”

Of course the easiest way to protect ourselves is to seldom go out.  About 30 years ago the trend towards “cocooning” was defined as “the practice of spending leisure time at home in preference to going out”.   That trend seems only likely to get stronger, though now I would call it “bunkering,” a preference to stay at home for self-protection.

I learned of the massacre when turning on the TV at 7:00 a.m., watched if for about 20 minutes and figured I learned about as much as any one knew.  I turned on my recorded three hours of Morning Joe and sped through it in 10 minutes as it only had scenes from Vegas, which meant endless speculation was in full swing.

The shooter was apparently the most normal of guys, the “contrarian profile of a mass shooter” according to a former FBI profiler.   I’ve seen a photo of him.  He had a nice smile, but he must have felt he had nothing to smile about any more.   My guess is he was mild mannered, not one to explode often while the heat of anger was accumulating like a pan on a stove we forget to turn off.

To me the biggest clue is he was 64.   That has given him decades to accumulate resentments and disappointments and people to blame for both.  Or maybe he just hates Donald Trump and identifies country music buffs as his supporters.  Eventually a theory will take hold, but I don’t know if it much matters.  There is only so much you can do to prevent the crazy angry from acting out their fantasies as long as there are guns a plenty.

If the shooter left a note, I’d like it to read:   “My sincere thanks to the NRA for protecting my right to bear arms.”

Did Trump Declare War on North Korea?

I don’t think so, but today the North Korean ambassador to the UN insists he did, referring to Trump’s warning that the regime “wouldn’t be around much longer” if they acted on their threats to the United States.   And another game of chicken.   The ambassador said if U. S. war planes come close to North Korea as they did recently, NOKO reserves the right to shoot them down in their self-defense.   Since after all, we are at war.

I don’t believe Kim Jong Un thinks we’re at war, but I am afraid that with all of this bombastic nuclear missile rattling by both sides, one side will become confused as to what the other side means, which could lead to a horrible miscalculation.

This goading on both sides might prompt one side or another to show “you can’t tell me what to do”.  For example, will the threat of shooting down our planes if they fly near NOKO again prompt Trump to prove he can’t be told what to do by this tin pot dictator?

And send the planes close again…..?

How can we know about a president who likes being unpredictable and prides himself on his instincts, not sources of knowledge, something that has worked surprisingly well for him up until now?

This just in……  Trump’s press secretary has stated that Trump certainly wasn’t declaring war on NOKO with some of his tweets.

Well, that’s good, if not all that surprising, but as someone else described the situation:  “North Korea is the land of lousy options.”  That remains the case and it is this dilemma that I had planned on writing about today, but figured I should verify we were not at war before bothering.

The Debt Ceiling Deal: A Loss for Republicans but a Win for Trump

While Trump has demeaned the Republican congressional leadership  on several occasions, he hadn’t totally thrown them under the bus like he did in the oval office last week.  The Republican establishment may finally be having second thoughts about gambling on the colosally self-centered Trump in hopes of getting what they want done in Congress.  The Washington Post sums up the situation so well, I will quote it at length.

“President Trump, a man of few allegiances who seized control of the Republican Party in a hostile takeover, suddenly aligned himself with Democrats on Wednesday on a series of key fiscal issues …

Trump confounded his party’s leaders when he cut a deal with Democratic congressional leaders — “Chuck and Nancy,” as the president informally referred to them — on a short-term plan to fund the government and raise its borrowing limit this month.

The president’s surprise stance upended sensitive negotiations over the debt ceiling and other crucial policy issues this fall and further imperiled his already tenuous relationships with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.).”

Trump even floated the notion he might be in favor of doing away with debt ceilings altogether, something anathema to the fiscal hawks in what is hard to even call “his party” at this point.  Actually, I’d say he has always been a party of one – Donald J. Trump.

Conservative columnist Jenifer Rubin captures Trump as well as anyone in one sentence can:  “Trump is a raging narcissist with no policy preferences who is motivated by personal grudges, vengeance and the rapacious need for affirmation.”

As for policy preferences, on the healthcare issue Trump showed his policy preference was for anything they could pass.  Trump’s grudge against McConnell came from the latter’s inability to pass a repeal/replace measure in the Senate, along with a failure to genuflect often in the president’s direction.

In the affirmation department Trump has been praised by the temporarily not-fake media for these actions.   So, who knows what other bi-partisan actions might develop as long as they make him look good.

DACCA recipients don’t give up hope.

On the other hand, it is best to think of Trump as kind of like hurricane Irma.  It’s hard to know where he’ll land , who will be spared and what overall damage might occur…..until it actually happens.


P. S. – For those who want a more detailed picture of the possible ramifications of Trump’s recent deal, here’s the link to the WAPO piece.

A Drive By Glance at American Foreign Affairs

What with Hurricane Harvey, the Mueller investigation and the three ring circus of the daily Trump show (six ring…. nine ring?), short shrift has been given to events abroad of late.  For example, have you heard anything about Syria recently?   I hadn’t so I did some googling.

An LA Times piece this morning sums up the situation there as “Syria may be in ruins, but it looks like Assad ‘has won the war militarily.”   In short, there is no talk these days among national powers about “Assad must go.” Nations who had been involved with trying to make that happen have become distracted with their own affairs.    After firing a few missiles the U. S. has had little involvement other than in efforts to squash ISIS.

One of those distracted nations is Saudi Arabia, still struggling with a civil war it has abetted in Yemen and now in a diplomatic wrangle with Qatar, severing relations with that nation along with Egypt and a few others in the area, who accuse Qatar of bolstering instability in the region.  Under more normal circumstances that would be a big story, but we have too many of them already.   Interested in learning more?  Go here.

Back to Syria, the corker is that a few weeks ago the  “Damascus International Fair — once a showpiece of economic and technological prowess, attracting investors from across the Arab world and beyond — was held for the first time since being shuttered early in the war.”   I’m waiting for some friend to go there and send me a post card.

Moving on.  What about the Iran Nuclear Treaty?  Well, it is still holding, but Trump continues to want to find a way to scrap it.  Along with other treaties he doesn’t like.  Former  U. N. Ambassador Bolton has a plan to get us out.  Trump may embrace it or find some other way to break the deal.  If you want to dive into Bolton’s idea, check out this piece.

Moving on to Afghanistan.   The new U. S. policy there did make headlines briefly awhile ago, but really it isn’t a policy.  It is an open ended recognition that if we pull out we lose (and that locale becomes a haven for terrorists who might attack us again), so we won’t and hope the Taliban, etc., impressed by our resolve, will finally come to the negotiating table.  Reminds me of Korea, where our troops have remained for over half a century.

What a nice segue.  When it comes to endangering world peace, North Korea continues to appear the largest existential threat to those in the region and ourselves and maybe the entire world.   KIM JONG-UN’ s insistence on developing his nuclear missile program will have to change or a military confrontation seems inevitable.   Despite his ranting about fire and fury, not even Trump can believe that if it comes down to that the outcome will be anything short of horrific for friends and foes alike.

Things seem particularly tense now as is usually the case when we take part in joint military exercises annually with the South Koreans and others.   That always prompts an increase in saber rattling by JONG-UN.

But since we have our own saber rattler in the White House, it is impossible to know how something said or steps taken by either might cross some sort of line that triggers the war machines.

The talk continues to be that China must take a bigger hand in controlling NOKO, but that has been stated over and over for years now.   Can TRUMP pressure China enough economically to make a difference this time?    Well, if not, we are looking at a very sobering situation down the line that I will get back to later.

One thing I do applaud TRUMP for is the attention he has put on the Korean issue even if he leaves me nervous in the process.  Administration after administration has let the issue of a nuclear armed NOKO slide leading us to a point where there isn’t much of the slide left and we better slow things down or we will fall into an abys the likes of which is painful to imagine.

The Arpaio Pardon: One More Shake of the Wobbly Pillars of our Republic

As you all probably know there is a huge storm lashing and flooding the Texas coast.  It is creating mass destruction but at least it will blow over in a few days.  What will remain are Donald Trump’s efforts to corrupt our political system, a growing storm of a different kind.

It would take a book to portray the numerous incidents whereby Trump has weakened the pillars of our political system, lambasting the press as fake, our intelligence agencies as politicized and/or incompetent, the judiciary as overreaching and the congress as impotent.  Of course,  many of us may share such sentiments as the public image of all of those institutions has suffered for some time now.  However, it is one thing to be critical of them and another to have no respect for them at all, to act with impunity as if the health of those institutions is not vitally important to the maintenance of our Republic.

Trump’s basic message is we cannot trust anyone but him.  The basic message of all demagogues.

The pardon Friday of Sherriff Joe Arpaio  exemplifies this attitude.   As described by Yahoo News, Arpaio, a Trump supporter, had  “been convicted of criminal contempt last month for failing to obey a federal judge’s order to stop targeting Latinos on the basis of their suspected immigration status.”

Trump’s position is Arpaio was just “doing his job.”   In other words, it is fine for law officers to ignore laws they find inconvenient.   Senator John McCain reacted by charging Trump with undermining the “law and order” emphasis of his campaign, but Trump has always emphasized order over law, contemptuous of legal niceties.

Arpaio’s tactics suit the Donald to a Tee.  That is really what the “president” has in mind by law and order.   I imagine police across the land have taken note.

Besides an ignoring-civil-rights tone to police work, the pardoning of Arpaio sends a message to all in Trump’s immediate orbit that the Donald is basically free to pardon any of them if they get in a tight spot.   How reassuring.

So often we hear of the wisdom of the founders in setting up the institutions of American government, but Trump may have found a loop hole.   The founders seem not to have imagined the possibility of a president pardoning with abandon.  Even using the pardon as a negotiating tool for his own self-protection.

I have heard some discussion as to whether the president can pardon himself.  I have no idea if the matter is clear cut.   Certainly if he thinks it might be of help, he’ll give it a try.

What Does it Take for Some People to be Disgusted by Trump’s Amorality?

I watched FOX cable news this morning figuring I would see a defense of our “president’s” flipping back to the position yesterday that he espoused Saturday that there was blame on both sides for the violence in Charlotte.  And “fine people” on both sides, too.

I think it would take a major research project to find some of those fine people among the white supremacists who were shouting anti-Jewish and other threatening slogans.  I am just so sick of Trump and his B. S. and those who still act as if he is a normal person. Either by now you see what a weak moral compass he has spinning around like a broken top or you likely never will.

Still, I’m happy to report that while Trump friendly arguments were made on FOX, of course, they were challenged by other FOX guests.  (And, I might add, despite the frequent silliness, some good debates pop out there, something I’d like to see more of on the liberal mutual admiration society that is MSNBC .)

Those wanting to defend Trump’s equal blame theory can point to some violence on the left from a radical fringe we might loosely call Antifa (anti-fascists), but they weren’t there to spew racism and white supremacy.  They were there to protest it.

This captures the gist:   Former KKK Grand Wizzard David Duke, now calling himself a white nationalist, reflected many on the far right who praised Trump’s equal blame statement given Saturday as it essentially diluted their greater share of the blame.   But then Duke reviled Trump for the obviously phony shift Monday where he finally pointed to neo-nazi’s and white supremacists as being the primary culprits.

Hey, get this.  I agree with David Duke, the second statement was phony, or as Charles Krauthammer said on Fox:  “His heart wasn’t in it.”  That’s why Trump later reversed course, reportedly surprising his staff in the process.

Now that Trump has returned to reiterating the Saturday statement, Duke is ecstatic again.

How can anyone in their right mind view praise from David Duke to be a good thing?

At this point one wonders if any major Republican figure will make some major stand against Trump for this, as have a few members of his manufacturing council who have resigned in protest.

Love to see it, but I’m not holding my breath.   When you’ve been dancing with the devil it is tough to bow out.  Especially when you still believe he might do you some good despite much evidence to the contrary.


P. S. – The white supremacist activities figure to blossom and I think it useful to read this portrait of what I think of as the new white far right.   They aren’t just your grandfather’s KKK or even neo-Nazi’s but various new groups of largely young men, usually clean cut and at times well spoken and well organized.   More attractive white supremacists.

Also, Antifa will undoubtedly be showing up at these white supremacist rallies and unfortunately provide a foil for the likes of Donald Trump to point to as say….  “see, they’re to blame, too.”   Take a glance at them.