Did Trump Declare War on North Korea?

I don’t think so, but today the North Korean ambassador to the UN insists he did, referring to Trump’s warning that the regime “wouldn’t be around much longer” if they acted on their threats to the United States.   And another game of chicken.   The ambassador said if U. S. war planes come close to North Korea as they did recently, NOKO reserves the right to shoot them down in their self-defense.   Since after all, we are at war.

I don’t believe Kim Jong Un thinks we’re at war, but I am afraid that with all of this bombastic nuclear missile rattling by both sides, one side will become confused as to what the other side means, which could lead to a horrible miscalculation.

This goading on both sides might prompt one side or another to show “you can’t tell me what to do”.  For example, will the threat of shooting down our planes if they fly near NOKO again prompt Trump to prove he can’t be told what to do by this tin pot dictator?

And send the planes close again…..?

How can we know about a president who likes being unpredictable and prides himself on his instincts, not sources of knowledge, something that has worked surprisingly well for him up until now?

This just in……  Trump’s press secretary has stated that Trump certainly wasn’t declaring war on NOKO with some of his tweets.

Well, that’s good, if not all that surprising, but as someone else described the situation:  “North Korea is the land of lousy options.”  That remains the case and it is this dilemma that I had planned on writing about today, but figured I should verify we were not at war before bothering.

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The Debt Ceiling Deal: A Loss for Republicans but a Win for Trump

While Trump has demeaned the Republican congressional leadership  on several occasions, he hadn’t totally thrown them under the bus like he did in the oval office last week.  The Republican establishment may finally be having second thoughts about gambling on the colosally self-centered Trump in hopes of getting what they want done in Congress.  The Washington Post sums up the situation so well, I will quote it at length.

“President Trump, a man of few allegiances who seized control of the Republican Party in a hostile takeover, suddenly aligned himself with Democrats on Wednesday on a series of key fiscal issues …

Trump confounded his party’s leaders when he cut a deal with Democratic congressional leaders — “Chuck and Nancy,” as the president informally referred to them — on a short-term plan to fund the government and raise its borrowing limit this month.

The president’s surprise stance upended sensitive negotiations over the debt ceiling and other crucial policy issues this fall and further imperiled his already tenuous relationships with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.).”

Trump even floated the notion he might be in favor of doing away with debt ceilings altogether, something anathema to the fiscal hawks in what is hard to even call “his party” at this point.  Actually, I’d say he has always been a party of one – Donald J. Trump.

Conservative columnist Jenifer Rubin captures Trump as well as anyone in one sentence can:  “Trump is a raging narcissist with no policy preferences who is motivated by personal grudges, vengeance and the rapacious need for affirmation.”

As for policy preferences, on the healthcare issue Trump showed his policy preference was for anything they could pass.  Trump’s grudge against McConnell came from the latter’s inability to pass a repeal/replace measure in the Senate, along with a failure to genuflect often in the president’s direction.

In the affirmation department Trump has been praised by the temporarily not-fake media for these actions.   So, who knows what other bi-partisan actions might develop as long as they make him look good.

DACCA recipients don’t give up hope.

On the other hand, it is best to think of Trump as kind of like hurricane Irma.  It’s hard to know where he’ll land , who will be spared and what overall damage might occur…..until it actually happens.


P. S. – For those who want a more detailed picture of the possible ramifications of Trump’s recent deal, here’s the link to the WAPO piece.

A Drive By Glance at American Foreign Affairs

What with Hurricane Harvey, the Mueller investigation and the three ring circus of the daily Trump show (six ring…. nine ring?), short shrift has been given to events abroad of late.  For example, have you heard anything about Syria recently?   I hadn’t so I did some googling.

An LA Times piece this morning sums up the situation there as “Syria may be in ruins, but it looks like Assad ‘has won the war militarily.”   In short, there is no talk these days among national powers about “Assad must go.” Nations who had been involved with trying to make that happen have become distracted with their own affairs.    After firing a few missiles the U. S. has had little involvement other than in efforts to squash ISIS.

One of those distracted nations is Saudi Arabia, still struggling with a civil war it has abetted in Yemen and now in a diplomatic wrangle with Qatar, severing relations with that nation along with Egypt and a few others in the area, who accuse Qatar of bolstering instability in the region.  Under more normal circumstances that would be a big story, but we have too many of them already.   Interested in learning more?  Go here.

Back to Syria, the corker is that a few weeks ago the  “Damascus International Fair — once a showpiece of economic and technological prowess, attracting investors from across the Arab world and beyond — was held for the first time since being shuttered early in the war.”   I’m waiting for some friend to go there and send me a post card.

Moving on.  What about the Iran Nuclear Treaty?  Well, it is still holding, but Trump continues to want to find a way to scrap it.  Along with other treaties he doesn’t like.  Former  U. N. Ambassador Bolton has a plan to get us out.  Trump may embrace it or find some other way to break the deal.  If you want to dive into Bolton’s idea, check out this piece.

Moving on to Afghanistan.   The new U. S. policy there did make headlines briefly awhile ago, but really it isn’t a policy.  It is an open ended recognition that if we pull out we lose (and that locale becomes a haven for terrorists who might attack us again), so we won’t and hope the Taliban, etc., impressed by our resolve, will finally come to the negotiating table.  Reminds me of Korea, where our troops have remained for over half a century.

What a nice segue.  When it comes to endangering world peace, North Korea continues to appear the largest existential threat to those in the region and ourselves and maybe the entire world.   KIM JONG-UN’ s insistence on developing his nuclear missile program will have to change or a military confrontation seems inevitable.   Despite his ranting about fire and fury, not even Trump can believe that if it comes down to that the outcome will be anything short of horrific for friends and foes alike.

Things seem particularly tense now as is usually the case when we take part in joint military exercises annually with the South Koreans and others.   That always prompts an increase in saber rattling by JONG-UN.

But since we have our own saber rattler in the White House, it is impossible to know how something said or steps taken by either might cross some sort of line that triggers the war machines.

The talk continues to be that China must take a bigger hand in controlling NOKO, but that has been stated over and over for years now.   Can TRUMP pressure China enough economically to make a difference this time?    Well, if not, we are looking at a very sobering situation down the line that I will get back to later.

One thing I do applaud TRUMP for is the attention he has put on the Korean issue even if he leaves me nervous in the process.  Administration after administration has let the issue of a nuclear armed NOKO slide leading us to a point where there isn’t much of the slide left and we better slow things down or we will fall into an abys the likes of which is painful to imagine.