“The Emperor has No Clothes” says Senator Bob Corker. Well, more or less.

I’ve been waiting for months for someone who has supported Trump in the past who finally can’t take it anymore.  Can’t pretend Trump’s administration is doing well.  That person turns out to be one Senator Bob Corker who, to the New York Times, “charged in an interview on Sunday that President Trump was treating his office like “a reality show,” with reckless threats toward other countries that could set the nation “on the path to World War III.”

If you haven’t heard of the tweet hand grenade exchange this weekend between Corker and Trump, it ended with Corker writing:  “It’s a shame the White House has become an adult day care center. Someone obviously missed their shift this morning.” 

Can you guess the adult who requires day care?

You could say Corker started it with some criticisms of Trump’s handling of the Charlottesville protest last May, suggesting his comments were not up to the standards of a president.  That he needed to up his game.

Much more recently Corker referred to the trio of Secretary of Defense Mattis, Chief of Staff Kelly and Secretary of State Tillerson as what keeps the White House from falling into chaos, not something the blister thin skin of “our” president could take, so Trump went to tweeting to tear Corker down, which led to Corker’s reply above.

In typical Trump fashion, he is so intent on getting back at Corker that he pays no attention to the importance of having the senator as an ally in congress if he actually wants to get anything done.   I believe Trump doesn’t ultimately care what he accomplishes as long as we all stay riveted to his “show” and he can makes us believe he’s accomplishing a lot.  And where that fails to place blame on someone else, the reverse of Harry Truman’s the “buck stops here”.   With Trump the buck stops anywhere except with him.

I urge you to read the notes of the  interview with Corker in the New York Times.  Because Corker is the chair of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and also on the Senate Budget Committee, this fall out between Trump and him could have numerous ramifications on what gets passed in congress and how our foreign relations develop, especially with North Korea and Iran.

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The Vegas Massacre and the New Normal

In the background Donald Trump is giving the standard stock speech about praying for the victims and their families and insisting “we are here for you”.   What is being here for you mean?  I realize that public figures have to say something, but do you think anyone feels consoled by these rote statements?  Just part of the necessary ritual I guess.

Nevada, an open carry state, has few gun laws, so no problem carrying around 50 caliber rifles that make grim jokes of the idea of “bullet proof” vests.   It accentuates the valor of the police and other first responders, but that won’t likely stop congress from passing a law now being considered to allow for more gun silencers, according to Bill Bratton,  former New York police commissioner.

Hunters want them to protect their hearing, it is argued.  That silencers could help insanely angry shooters avoid immediate detection doesn’t count for much I guess.

In subtle ways I think we are all becoming more like Israelis.   We have to live our lives with dim thoughts of sudden horrific attack tripping across our minds.   Talked to an Israeli on a plane awhile back and she said you get use to it.  She said it’s not all negative.  It helps you feel more alive.

I favor other ways to make me feel more alive.   Terror tends to make me want to stick to small venues, such as my condo.  Controlling guns seems off the table, even though it will be talked about a lot as usual.  Instead we seem more inclined to reshape the world for our self protection.  I heard a weapons expert suggest metal detectors be placed in all Casinos.  Also, I heard talk of making alterations in buildings to make clear lines of sight harder for shooters to find.  If we can’t control guns I guess we have to do something.

I can imagine small ways we can keep ourselves safer.   Bomb sniffing Apple watches might become the new craze.

Imagine a mother daughter conversation prior to a concert:  “Don’t forget your Kevlar vest, honey.” “Mom, those vests aren’t really great, and it doesn’t match my outfit.  I’ll just have to take my chances.”  “O. K. just remember to duck and cover.”

Of course the easiest way to protect ourselves is to seldom go out.  About 30 years ago the trend towards “cocooning” was defined as “the practice of spending leisure time at home in preference to going out”.   That trend seems only likely to get stronger, though now I would call it “bunkering,” a preference to stay at home for self-protection.

I learned of the massacre when turning on the TV at 7:00 a.m., watched if for about 20 minutes and figured I learned about as much as any one knew.  I turned on my recorded three hours of Morning Joe and sped through it in 10 minutes as it only had scenes from Vegas, which meant endless speculation was in full swing.

The shooter was apparently the most normal of guys, the “contrarian profile of a mass shooter” according to a former FBI profiler.   I’ve seen a photo of him.  He had a nice smile, but he must have felt he had nothing to smile about any more.   My guess is he was mild mannered, not one to explode often while the heat of anger was accumulating like a pan on a stove we forget to turn off.

To me the biggest clue is he was 64.   That has given him decades to accumulate resentments and disappointments and people to blame for both.  Or maybe he just hates Donald Trump and identifies country music buffs as his supporters.  Eventually a theory will take hold, but I don’t know if it much matters.  There is only so much you can do to prevent the crazy angry from acting out their fantasies as long as there are guns a plenty.

If the shooter left a note, I’d like it to read:   “My sincere thanks to the NRA for protecting my right to bear arms.”