Obama calls Trump’s Response to the coronavirus “an absolute, chaotic disaster.”

I could not have described it any better Mr. President.   Glad you’re getting warmed up for the big fight to dethrone the boy who would be king.  We need a lot of you now as your buddy Joe is sort of trapped in his basement at the moment, a bad look but he’s in a tough spot.  He’s just not in the center of the action right now.

As always, Trump is in the center of the news because his main goal is to be there.  He’s great at doing or saying something controversial which gets top news billing because he is the president.  In contrast to him is New York Governor Andrew Cuomo who has basically been the banner carrier of the Democratic party of late as he has shown the nation in his daily press conferences what a real leader looks like as opposed to president putz.

Cuomo has been the text book leader in turning the virus around in New York city and state.  A real leader takes charge, tells the truth (sure often with some positive spin) and takes responsibility for his actions, as President Harry Truman summed up with a sign he kept on his desk:  “The buck stops here.”   With Trump the buck never stops with him.  If it’s a problem it’s someone else’s fault.

Trump’s response to Obama’s criticism is predictable: he trashes him.  Deflecting from his own incompetence, Trump hangs that label on Obama.  And he ups the ante by asserting some crime Obama committed, while refusing to state what it is.  “You know, ” he tells reporters.  “You know.”

I’d love to see a chorus from reporters ring out:  “No, we don’t.” (and we suspect neither do you.)

Trump’s phony act is so obvious, but he keeps the press at bay with his ability to churn up enough outrageous news bits as to keep reporters buzzing about and failing to land on something, some one thing to demand an explanation of.

How about this topic?  Trump continually brags about what a great job he’s done vs. the virus.   But, according to the News Tribune:  “The United States and South Korea each reported their first confirmed case of the coronavirus to the World Health Organization on Jan. 20.”

Since then around 300 South Korean’s have died of the virus, compared to around 90,000 Americans.  We have about eight times their population, so to make the comparison fair and square, let’s make the situation per capita and say if South Korea had our population, they would have lost about 2,400 people.

90,000 to 2,400………………..  Still, a huge disparity.  REALLY HUGE!  Please, reporters unite.  Demand Trump explain that statistic in the face of his bragging about what a great job he’s done.  Bring this up over and over a gain, like a dog with a bone.  Keep biting and don’t let him deflect the questioning elsewhere.

Trump deflects by blaming Obama for leaving him “a bare cupboard” of pandemic supplies” and nothing else.  At least the Obama team left him with a basic primer of suggestions of what needed to be attended to and an office within the National Security Council whose job was to track potential pandemics world wide.

Trump ignored the suggestions and closed the office.   Also, he has had over three years to develop his own plan to battle pandemics.  What’s Trump’s plan?  Open up the economy willy nilly and see what happens while gambling on a vaccine developed soon enough to save us?

Again I would like reporters to demand an explanation for why 90,000 carona deaths here, while South Korea has had about 300 (or an adjusted 2400 if we add the population differential).

Please reporters, bring this up the next time Trump claims he has done a great job battling the virus.


P. S. – My link above to the News Tribune is worth following as that news source gives a brief description of what South Korea did and we did not.

Governor Cuomo for Presidential

Seems like we have traversed at warp speed to a new even weirder and more frightening world then the one we were living in about two weeks ago.   Then my big question was:  Would Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders come together to unite the Democratic party for the presidential run?   Now, at the moment at least, both seem irrelevant.  They are barely seen or heard from.

That’s what happens I guess when a pandemic spreads at a geometric pace creating a new world of problems.   The new drama entangles the ever present mercurial Trump in a curious dance with New York’s governor Andrew Cuomo, who has become the star of the Democratic party through his impressive marshaling of resources to fight the carona virus in New York city and state.

New York has about 40% of the 166,000 carona cases in the land.  And the numbers continue to rise rapidly, which is why it is often called the epicenter of this invisible war.  However, Cuomo’s government has at least slowed down the rate of increase from doubling every two days to doubling every five or six.   Still, a losing fight at the moment, but he’s the kind of guy who gives one confidence he has a plan to win over time.

Cuomo’s plan is to slow down the virus’ growth enough in New York to flatten the curve of its progression so that our health care workers can regroup and continue the fight as the fury crosses our country.

Trump has never had a plan.  He’s relied on his feelings, like when he said he had a “feeling” that the nation could get back to business by Easter Sunday.  He abandoned that feeling, but his lack of a plan (and awareness) screams such as Trump’s handling a conference call yesterday with the nation’s governors.  When Colorado’s Steve Bullock asserted that he had only a day’s left of testing supplies, Trump acted surprised.  “We’ve tested more now than any nation in the world…..I haven’t heard about testing being a problem.” (read more  here).

Is Trump the only human in America who hasn’t heard day after day a lack of testing is a problem? A big problem.  And does he understand the meaning of per capita?   He brags that we have tested more people than South Korea?   Well, true but we have six times the population of South Korea.  In a March 9 survey of cases worldwide when it comes to tests per million people, Korea ranks second and the U. S. ranks 15th (read more here).  ……Little Bahrain was first.

I spoke of Trump and Cuomo being entangled in a curious dance.  Cuomo needs Trump’s help as do all of the governors, so he watches his words and tempers his criticism most of the time.  And praises when he can.

Much of Cuomo’s criticism comes from comparison.   Cuomo has a news conference usually around 11:00 a.m. EDT, while Trump has one later in the day.  Check them both out or just google Cuomo and Trump for lots more details.

You watch the two perform and decide who is more presidential.

HEALTH CARE: The Republicans are so Shakespearian

To be “hoist with one’s own petard,” is Shakespeare’s way of saying “To be undone by one’s own schemes.”  It fits the Republican attempts to come up with a replacement for Obamacare.   It makes me so happy.  Probably not in the long run, but for the moment.

It is a wonderful illustration of how different it is to actually try to create something as opposed to trashing something else.   All I’ve heard for seven years is how bad Obamacare is and how they would repeal and replace it.   Well, mostly repeal, they didn’t get around to figuring out what to replace it with.  It was easy to seem like they knew how do to it, until they actually got the chance, much to their surprise I’d say.

But that was their big promise, so they stuck themselves in the butt with it.

Obamacare needs a lot of fixing, but both House and Senate Republican plans don’t fix much of anything except give back more money to the rich and, more important for the moment, they don’t satisfy enough party Congressmen to get anything passed.

That’s because the Republican party has come to stand for little more than grabbing power and holding on tight.  Of course, there are exceptions.  Ohio governor John Kasich being one, but so few as not to matter in the whole picture.   I think the Republican party lost its identity during the G. W. Bush years and all they could salvage was to become the Un-Obama party.  Anyone willing to trash Obama was welcome.  Donald Trump come on down (Do you recall how the other Republican contenders vilified him in the primaries?  They seem unable to.)

Agreeing on doing something concrete is a whole different story as I learned in my 20s when joining an amazing group of high school students who had started their own school, dissatisfied with the public schools.  I was one of the designated teachers, but the school was truly free in that I couldn’t demand anything of students.  I could only try to persuade them.   It was frustrating but taught me much about humans working together.

The relevance here is that the kids and teachers at this school could all agree on the many things wrong with public schools, but when it came to agreeing on what we would do and how we would operate each day, we could not agree on much.

And that is the Republican managed Congress right now.   To call it “controlled” is an overstatement.  The party, once known for its discipline as compared with the Democrat’s comparable anarchy, can’t even control itself.

Maybe the Republican inability to pass a replacement plan will lead to the two parties actually making some improvements in Obamacare.   It would actually make both parties look better.  Stranger things have happened.

Like Donald Trump became president.

THE TRUMP SHOW CONTINUES: The Second Republican Debate

Donald Trump’s unique achievement has been to turn politics into entertainment by being the most entertaining of the candidates.  Tonight figures to be another big show.  If it is, I think the Donald’s numbers are safe.   Trump’s support will not go down until his fans have become tired of his shtick, just as fans of any popular TV show drop off over time.  The novelty loses its magic.  The tension now lies in our not knowing how long he can keep the show going.

The curiosity for me is which other candidate or candidates jump up their poll numbers tonight and how they do it.

If I were in a position to ask the Donald a question, I’d ask him to explain what he meant by saying he was an “entertainer”  in response to criticism for his comment about Carly Fiorina (“Would you vote for this face?”)  Is he implying that an entertainer should be judged differently than a politician?

I think he revealed much with that comment, surprisingly so, like an actor in a movie who gives an aside to the audience and then returns to character.   He and the character are not one and the same.   Trump’s authenticity isn’t as authentic as it seems.

I think many of his fans see the actor in Trump, but it doesn’t matter as long as they like the script.

But enough of that……   To go beyond the entertainment factor, how should we judge these candidates as presidential timber?  According to conservative columnist Jennifer Rubin there are seven things to look for in candidates who are not ready to be president .

Though I seldom agree with her on other topics, like her estimation of Obama (“feckless”), I think she’s an astute critic of her own party.  It might be interesting to read the list below and guess who she might be referring to and then go to her column for elaboration and her suggested culprits:

  1. If you plead on a major issue that it is a hypothetical ….. you are not ready for prime time.
  2. If you say you will have “advisers for that” in reference to major policy decisions or a basic understanding of the world, you are not ready for prime time.
  3. If you delight in creating chaos, you are not ready for prime time.
  4. If you make a martyr out of a government employee who refuses to do her job in compliance with the law (common law, statute or constitutional decision), you are not ready for prime time.
  5. If you declare you are in favor of a constitutional amendment to address some issue, you are not ready for prime time.
  6. If you attack the questioner or the question, you are not ready for prime time.
  7. If you promise to “abolish the IRS,” build a wall along the entire Mexican (or Canadian) border, get rid of the National Security Agency (instead only gather information on known terrorists) or start a trade war with China, you are not ready for prime time.

A HAPPY NEW YEAR? I HAVE NO IDEA…..

Twas the day before New Year’s and despite wracking my mind, no upbeat year’s end message can I find.   However, I do have a  web site I want to share with you, The Fiscal Times brought to my attention by a reader who sent me a link while saying:   “It is this crap that drives me crazy, and adds further evidence that there really isn’t any difference between the parties after the rhetoric dies.”

He is referring to the 1600 page budget bill Congress passed before heading home for the holidays, which included many late-addition “surprises” hardly anyone noticed before the bill was passed.  The article linked here points out five of them that are head shakers for honest folk whether on the left or right.

The article isn’t long, so rather than me summarize the points I’d rather add a couple of points of my own.  First, despite the outrageous way this bill was passed, I am glad they passed it.  The alternative was to go into next year without a budget and a Republican controlled Congress, including libertarians who seem quite willing to continue to treat the “full faith and credit of the United States” as if it were a pin ball game.

They are so focused upon smaller government they seem not to have noticed the Chinese economy just surpassed ours in size this year and that China has taken various steps to develop currency exchanges that do not hinge upon the American dollar.  Nothing the Chinese would like more than for us to offer further evidence to the world that we have an increasingly unworkable order.

So, I’m glad that budget was passed despite it’s ugly underbelly.

Here is my other point.   While I have run across The Fiscal Times before, I never took a good look at it.  Since I liked that article I began exploring other pieces on the The Fiscal Times web site and found them interesting and not obviously partisan like so many other sites.  In their Statement of Purpose, they claim to be non-partisan, and so far I believe them.

If you do check it out, let me know what you think by replying using the comment link at the end of  all that stuff below.  If you like the site, think of it as a late Christmas (holiday) present.

If not, you can think of me as the Grinch.

THE EBOLA SCARE: When Common Sense is Nonsense

I wrote about the Ebola “crisis” only about two weeks ago, but now it seems like ancient history.   Here’s a history question:  Regarding Ebola, do you know the significance of Nov 7?   That was the final day for those who had had any contact with Thomas Eric Duncan, who died of Ebola in Dallas,  to show signs of Ebola.   I assume no one did.   Otherwise we’d hear all about it.  That’s really good news, but now Ebola stateside is a distant memory and news that isn’t bad isn’t really news, with the rare exception of great news, like astronauts landing on the moon or VE Day, the end of the European front of WW II.

In retrospect, some of the Ebola scare was good, in that it pressed hospitals around the nation to actually think through the question:  What do we do if an Ebola patient walks in through our doors?  In a previous post, I referred to the “Dallas debacle”, but most hospitals would have reacted in the same chaotic way.   If anyone had come in off the street with Ebola to a hospital before I haven’t heard of it.   Ebola cases get shipped here to one of our specialist facilities. They just don’t appear out of nowhere. At least hadn’t.

Surely, that question must have been raised by medical staff in hospitals here and there throughout the country, but in typical bureaucratic fashion, that got lost in the shuffle. The changes needed would have cost money and staff time, perhaps a lot, and the likelihood of it happening must have seemed small, so …

With that one case in Dallas the likelihood suddenly seemed huge. With many Americans thinking it was only “common sense” to make everyone who traveled from those afflicted west African countries remain in 21 day quarantine.   Well, common sense to a point maybe, but when it came to doing that with health workers who had volunteered to go to Africa, it was just plain wrong headed.   As President Obama said, those medical volunteers should be treated as heroes.  Instead they tended to be treated like criminals.

Centuries ago common sense  supported the notion that the sun revolved around the earth because when we looked at the sky we could see the sun moving.   That’s not a fair analogy, but while common sense has valuel, the evolution of science has come in contrast to so-called common sense. i. e. common sense is often misleading, such as in the case of eye witnesses of crimes who used to be thought of as providing great evidence until studies showed different eyes can see events differently.   Thank God for the discovery of DNA.

The problem with the “common sense” angle prized by politicians like the governors of New Jersey and New York, is that an abundance of caution would likely dissuade medical volunteers to go to West Africa where the real problem, the biggest danger to us all in the future, needs to be eradicated.   It is “penny wise and pound foolish,” to apply an old expression.

Common sense was actually head-in-the-sand thinking, but popular with the people, so certain politicians had to slop it up like pigs at a trough.   According to polls 70% of Americans thought it a good idea.   I wonder how many of those polled were libertarian leaning with a strong belief in reducing governmental meddling.

…..except when each of them gets scared enough to demand more meddling.  That’s only common sense.

Here’s to a Republican Senate Victory Tomorrow.

I have so many thoughts and questions on world events jammed together in my little mind that  I feel mentally constipated.   I need to relieve myself of some of them or my head will burst, but where to begin the flow?

I’m not up to tackling the ISIS crisis, Ebola or even the Ukraine (remember when that was the big attention grabber ?   Still, a near civil war brewing there in the western part with Putin playing his games, but it is a tired story, not quite hot enough at the moment to attract our public attention.)

Let’s look at the Senate race which  is mildly interesting to me because I watch enough cable news to be ensnared into viewing the event like a horse race or football game and the “two teams” seem close enough to expect a good match tomorrow, even though the pundits are leaning towards a Republican victory.

Unlike those pundits, I don’t take it very seriously as it seems to me which ever party holds the Senate reins (which is like riding a bucking bronco), the familiar gridlock will continue.   At the moment, I like the idea of a Republican victory simply because it should make for a more interesting next  two years, as they would be in a position to actually develop shared legislation in both Houses.   That would tie them down to their ideas instead of allowing them the luxury of a constant chorus of we’d do it better than Obama.

O. K. show us what you got.

I don’t think they’ve got much, frankly, and it is so much easier to agree in criticisms of Obama and the Democrats than actually agreeing among themselves on something specific to do.   Really, do you think Ted Cruz could agree on much with anyone other than possibly his clone?  That the Republican party can’t even govern itself might be revealed prior to the 2016 election and give the Democrats real governing power then, both Houses and the presidency, assuming typhoon Hilary doesn’t run out of wind  by then through over exposure.

Of course, from a liberal perspective there are negatives if the Republicans win the Senate (they already control the House).  For one, President Obama would likely have even less chance to accomplish much of anything the next two years, but how would that be so different than the last two?

Also, if a supreme court judge or two needs replacing over these next two years, for Obama to find  someone who could get nominated and not add to the conservative majority of the court might be so hard, we’d have an eight (or less?) member court for awhile.   And of course, with the Republicans controlling the committee chairs, Senate investigations of the Obama regime would multiply like dandy lions in an Illinois summer, vying for TV time with fellow House Republican Darrell Issa’s ongoing contemporary version of judgement at Nuremburg when it comes to all things Obama.

Maybe this all wouldn’t be so good for the country, but it figures to me more interesting to follow than two more years of largely the same boring political theater.   I say:  Let’s have some new boring political theater.

My attitude reminds me of something the romantic English poet John Keats wrote centuries ago.  “What shocks the virtuous philosopher, delights the chameleon poet.”

I’m feeling poetic today.  And a little less constipated now.